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Monday, September 21 • 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Live lock-free or deadlock (practical Lock-free programming), Part I

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Part I: Introduction to lock-free programming. We will cover the fundamentals of lock-free vs lock-based programming, explore the reasons to write lock-free programs as well as the reasons not to. We will learn, or be reminded, of the basic tools of lock-free programming and consider few simple examples. To make sure you stay on for part II, we will try something beyond the simple examples, for example, a lock-free list, just to see how insanely complex the problems can get. Part II: having been burned on the complexities of generic lock-free algorithms in part I, we take a more practical approach: assuming we are not all writing STL, what limitations can we really live with? Turns out that there are some inherent limitations imposed by the nature of the concurrent problem: is here really such a thing as “concurrent queue” (yes, sort of) and we can take advantages of these limitations (what an idea, concurrency actually makes something easier!) Then there are practical limitations that most application programmers can accept: is there really such a thing as a “lock-free queue” (may be, and you don’t need it). We will explore practical examples of (mostly) lock-free data structures, with actual implementations and performance measurements. Even if the specific limitations and simplifying assumptions used in this talk do not apply to your problem, the main idea to take away is how to find such assumptions and take advantage of them, because, chances are, you can use lock-free techniques and write code that works for you and is much simpler than what you learned before.

Speakers
avatar for Fedor Pikus

Fedor Pikus

Chief Engineering Scientist, Mentor Graphics
Fedor G Pikus is a Chief Engineering Scientist in the Design to Silicon division of Mentor Graphics Corp. His earlier positions included a Senior Software Engineer at Google and a Chief Software Architect for Calibre PERC, LVS, DFM at Mentor Graphics. He joined Mentor Graphics in 1998 when he made a switch from academic research in computational physics to software industry. His responsibilities as a Chief Scientist include planning long-term... Read More →


Monday September 21, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Hopper Theater Meydenbauer Center